INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

We believe that even in these difficult economic times, the UK has a moral responsibility to help the poorest people in the world. We will continue to honour our aid commitments, whilst at the same time ensuring much greater transparency and scrutiny of aid spending to deliver value for money for British taxpayers and to maximise the impact of our aid budget.

The bigger picture

Justine GreeningFrom 2013 the UK will become the first G20 Government to meet the UN target of spending 0.7 per cent of national income on international development. We think that aid is not just morally right, but it is also firmly in our national interest.

But we are acutely aware of our duty to ensure that every penny of this is well spent. That's why we're pulling out of countries such as China and Russia which no longer need our help and ending funding to international organisations which aren't delivering.

We're also ensuring that what we spend gets results, asking for real evidence that it is really doing good, and making what we spend more transparent so that taxpayers can see exactly where their money is going and what it is doing.

Honouring our commitment to spend 0.7% of GNI on international development

Action to date

• As we pledged in our manifesto, in the 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review, the Coalition Government became the first G20 government ever to set out detailed, year-by-year plans to meet the UN target of spending 0.7 per cent of our national income (GNI) as aid from 2013.

Planned actions

• From 2013 we will spend 0.7 per cent of our GNI on international development.

Ensuring greater transparency and scrutiny of aid

Action to date

• We have conducted a bilateral aid review and are ending aid to countries which no longer need it, such as Russia and China.

• We have conducted a multilateral aid review of the international organisations that receive British aid, ending funding to underperforming organisations, such as the ILO and and UN-HABITAT and directing more funding to the best, such as the GAVI Alliance and UNICEF.

• We have set up an Independent Aid Watchdog to provide tough, external scrutiny of all aid spending.

• We have introduced a new Aid Transparency Guarantee so people can monitor how aid is spent.

Planned actions

• We will continue to scrutinise the countries and organisations we give aid to to make sure that our aid is being spent as effectively as possible.

Helping people to prosper

Action to date

• Nearly 12 million people have been helped to access savings, credit and insurance through UK aid - allowing them to make small investments and save for times of crisis.

• We set up the Africa Free Trade initiative last year to provide practical help to break through barriers to trade such as border post bureaucracy. In February 2011, we also launched the TradeMark initiative and are supporting partners to create a free trade area across 26 countries in eastern and southern Africa.

• We have improved the land and property rights of 1.1 million people.

Planned actions

By 2015 we will have:

  • Provided more than 50 million people with the means to work their way out of poverty.
  • Helped up to half of the countries in Africa benefit from freer trade.
  • Secured the right to land and property for more than six million people.
Tackling hunger and extreme poverty

Action to date

• British aid has helped more than 3 million people to escape extreme poverty through social assistance using cash transfer programmes.

• In September 2011, we published Scaling Up Nutrition – the UK's position paper on undernutrition – which set out in detail how we will expand our programmes to tackle malnutrition. As a result, we will now reach 20 million children under the age of five through nutrition-related programmes.

• UK aid has helped six million people with emergency food aid in response to the drastic food shortages in the Horn of Africa and other areas. Longer term, we are pioneering new ways to build up food security in places like Karamojo in Uganda, where 445,000 people are being helped to grow their own food, increase their range of crops and improve agricultural infrastructure.

Planned actions

By 2015 we will have:

  • Helped more than six million of the world’s poorest people to escape extreme poverty.
  • Stopped 10 million more children going hungry.
  • Ensured another four million people have food throughout the year.
Getting children into school

Action to date

• Over the last two years aid from Britain has supported 5.3 million children ( 2.5 million of them girls) to go to primary school.

• British aid has, in the last two years, supported 600,000 children (including 260,000 girls) in lower secondary school.

• We will be training 190,000 teachers a year by 2015.

Planned actions

By 2015 we will have:

  • Supported nine million children in primary school.
  • Supported two million children in lower secondary school.
  • Trained more than 190,000 teachers.
Saving lives and preventing disease

Action to date

• In June 2011, the UK announced it would support the GAVI Alliance to vaccinate more than 80 million under-fives against killer diseases like pneumonia and diarrhoea. British aid has ensured that 21 million children have already been immunised.

• A million more women are now using modern methods of family planning thanks to British aid.

• In the last year UK aid delivered more than 12 million bednets to prevent malaria. Use of these nets for one year will prevent over 66,000 child deaths.

Planned actions

By 2015 we will:

  • Help vaccinate more children against preventable diseases than there are people in the whole of England.
  • Save the lives of at least 50,000 women in pregnancy and childbirth and 250,000 newborn babies.
  • Enable at least ten million more women use modern methods of family planning by 2015.
  • Help halve malaria deaths in ten of the worst affected countries.
Providing clean water and sanitation

Action to date

• Across our country programmes we have provided two million people with clean water.

• UK aid has helped two million people get access to better sanitation.

• We're directly running hygiene projects in 15 of our focus countries and contribute to many more through our support to global bodies like the UN which will help us to reach our target. So far, we have improved hygiene for 7.4 million people.

Planned actions

By 2015 we will:

  • Give 15 million people access to clean drinking water.
  • Improve access to sanitation for 25 million people.
  • Improve hygiene for 15 million to help stop people getting sick.
Making countries safer and fairer

Action to date

• We are already expanding our work in fragile and conflict affected states with three-quarters of our focus countries falling into this category.

• We have supported freer and fairer elections in 5 countries with over 76 million people voting in elections supported by UK aid.

• Starting from this year, we have been developing new and innovative justice programmes which focus specifically on women, beginning from 2012. 300,000 women and girls have already benefitted from improved access to justice thanks to British aid.

• We've published new guidelines on spending up to 5% of our in-country aid on strengthening the accountability of governments to their people. Following our aid reviews in March 2011, we are working to tackle corruption and strengthen accountability in specific countries, including by working with local citizens' groups and the media. We have helped 17 million people to hold decision makers to account.

Planned actions

By 2015 we will:

  • Focus 30 per cent of our aid on war torn and unstable countries by 2014.
  • Support freer and fairer elections in 13 countries with more than 300 million voters.
  • Help ten million women access justice through the courts, police and legal assitance.
  • Support 40 million people to hold authorities to account.
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